Thursday, April 06, 2006

Park Factors - 2005

Just thought I'd post the most recent park factors on here for easy reference. I got them from USPatiot's website HERE. I like to use his factors because they are regressed.
TEAM   YRS Run PF HR PF
ARI 5 1.05 1.06
ATL 5 1.00 0.99
BAL 5 0.97 1.01
BOS 5 1.02 0.97
CHA 5 1.02 1.13
CHN 5 1.00 1.04
CIN 3 0.99 1.06
CLE 5 0.98 0.96
COL 5 1.15 1.14
DET 5 0.97 0.93
FLA 5 0.96 0.93
HOU 5 1.02 1.04
KC 2 0.98 0.91
LA 5 0.94 1.01
LAA 5 0.98 0.97
MIL 5 1.00 1.04
MIN 5 1.01 0.95
NYA 5 0.99 1.03
NYN 5 0.97 0.95
OAK 5 0.99 1.01
PHI 2 1.03 1.07
PIT 5 1.00 0.95
SD 2 0.94 0.91
SEA 5 0.95 0.96
SF 5 0.97 0.89
STL 5 0.98 0.96
TB 5 0.99 0.96
TEX 5 1.06 1.07
TOR 6 1.03 1.05
WAS 1 0.96 0.94
So, Miller Park is a neutral offensive park but gives up 4% more HRs than average.

5 Comments:

Anonymous southwest brewer said...

what do you think the reason is that the numbers don't necessarily matchup? Some have higher HR, some have higher scoring......Without really knowing about the parks, wouldn't you expect the parks that give up more homeruns to have a matching (or nearly matching) number for runs scored?

Seems like a park that gives up less HR's, but more runs (Kansas City) doesn't make sense. Do they give up extra runs w/ poor defense?

White Sox are the opposite....would that lead you to think they play solid defense to prevent a lot of runs b/c they average less runs scored, while a lot of HR's are hit there?

4:30 AM  
Blogger rluzinski said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

11:18 AM  
Blogger rluzinski said...

If a park gives up below average HRs but above average runs, it must be conducive to offense it other ways. It might give up more doubles or allow less strike outs. There are a alot of factors in a ball park that can affect a plate appearance:

* size of outfield
* Amount of foul territory
* Weather
* Altitude
* Type of grass

Among others. As a result, you can have park factors for BB, K, doubles, triples.... whatever.

Defense should be largely factored out since it compares how a team does at home vs/ on the road. The White Sox's good defense should be pretty consistent between different parks.

11:25 AM  
Blogger Robert R. said...

I know other teams have complained in the past that the Miller Park infield grass is a "hayfield", so I definitely think that's part of it.

2:05 PM  
Blogger rluzinski said...

Here are the run values (per the Hardball Times Annual) for each BIP event:

OF: -0.008
GB: 0.001
LD: 0.018

So an average LD is worth 1.8% more runs compared to an average park. All OF hit factors are below 90 except HR/OF (104). LD occur more often than average, which might explain/have something to do with Jenkins leading the lead in them last year.

1:10 AM  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home